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Instructional Strategies and Their Emphasis in Schools July 2, 2013

Module 1 of EDU 6526, Survey of Instructional Strategies, encouraged us to consider what we as educators need to keep in mind when implementing strategies that are aimed at supporting all learners. In the resource Classroom Instruction that Works, Dean et al. (2012) describe nine teaching strategies that support high achievement for all students. These strategies are meant to promote the development of a wider view of how “different influences work together to help all students realize their learning goals.” (2012, p.vii) This philosophy goes beyond the usual bandwagon strategies that claim to be the best and most effective and are often used in isolation. Dean et al.’s nine strategies provide a framework through which all students can reach their full potential rather than simply bringing students up to standard.

We were asked to describe which of the nine strategies were most emphasized in schools today I noticed a diversity of responses that were submitted by my peers. My response stated that the setting of objectives and learning goals, assigning homework, and identifying similarities and differences are three of the nine strategies that I believe are emphasized in schools today. A classmate stated that no homework is assigned until middle school and she believed that the most emphasized strategies were identifying similarities and differences, grouping and positive rewards (Van Loon, 2013). Another classmate reported that she thought the emphasized strategies were cooperative learning and setting objectives and providing feedback (Washington, 2013). Yet another classmate writes that she believes the most used strategies are summary and note taking and cooperative learning (Hamilton, 2013). While it appears that several of us are in agreement that grouping and cooperative learning are widely used strategies in schools, there are also a wide variety of other strategies that are considered important. This makes sense to me because when we consider the different contexts in which we teach – such as grade level, community characteristics, and subject area – the use of and emphasis on a variety of strategies seems to align with best practices. Through this course I aim to be able to apply appropriate instructional strategies based on the context of my teaching which will involve making decisions prior to, during, and following instruction.

Resources:

Dean, C. B., Hubbell, E. R., Pitler, H., Stone, B. (2012). Classroom instruction that works: Research-based strategies for increasing student achievement. Denver, CO: Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning.

Hamilton, K. (2013, July 1). Week 1 discussion. Message posted to https://bbweb-prod.spu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_74199_1%26url%3D

Mutal, S. (2013, June 27). Module 1 discussion. Message posted to https://bbweb-prod.spu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_74199_1%26url%3D

Van Loon, M. (2013, June 28). Strategies used in a Waldorf school. Message posted to https://bbweb-prod.spu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_74199_1%26url%3D

Washington, S. (2013, June 28). Strategies used in schools. Message posted to https://bbweb-prod.spu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_74199_1%26url%3D

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One Response to “Instructional Strategies and Their Emphasis in Schools”

  1. Flexibility in use of instructional strategies supports implementation of common core state standards (CCSS). CCSS provide the final targets for student learning and give the educator flexibility in how students achieve these standards.


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